Cleveland-Akron residents sleep soundly

Zillow Published:

By Nora Tooher

Residents of the Cleveland-Akron metro area must have clean consciences: They sleep more soundly than anyone else in Ohio.

The Cleveland-Akron metro area, which includes Tallmadge, was 41st on SleepBetter.org’s Sleepless City Index. The study – using data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s annual Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey – ranked the 100 largest metros in the country in terms of how bleary-eyed residents are each morning.

The vast majority of C-Town-Akron area residents get a good night’s sleep, with only 20.2 percent not getting enough sleep more than half the time.

In contrast, Columbus was No. 7 on the Sleepless City Index, with 23.1 percent of people saying they don’t get enough sleep more than half the time. Dayton was No. 11, with 22.9 percent of residents suffering from sleep deprivation. Cincinnati was No. 26 (20.3 percent suffer from sleeplessness) and Toledo was 32nd, with 21 percent of its population not getting enough sleep.

To determine the rankings, SleepBetter calculated the average number of days per month that respondents reported inadequate sleep, as well as the percentage of respondents reporting inadequate sleep more than half of the time.

For example, folks in Kansas City, Mo. average 8.5 days a month without enough sleep – perhaps because of over-indulgence in the city’s famous barbecue. But only 20.2 percent of K.C.-area residents say they don’t get enough sleep more than half the time, giving it an overall ranking of 48th.

Charleston, W.Va., is the most sleep-deprived city in the country, with more than a quarter – 27.5 percent of residents – reporting they don’t get enough sleep more than half the time.

Knoxville, Tenn., had the second-highest sleeplessness score, with 24.1 percent of folks there not getting enough sleep more than half the time. Paducah, Ky., was third on the Sleepless City Index, with 25.6 percent of people not getting enough sleep more than half the time. Colorado Springs, Colo., came in fourth (23.8 percent) and Madison, Wis., was fifth (24.7 percent).

Sleeplessness is becoming an epidemic in the United States, the study’s authors warned. They noted that lack of sleep affects physical health, weight, cognitive function, relationships and productivity, and increases the risk of accidents.

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